Thoughts From Literature — October 2022

The Caves of Steel by Isaac Asimov

Cody Collins

--

Image from author

At the start of 2021, I set a goal to read at least one book a month. Along the way, I've read many insightful and thought-provoking books.

As I've read, I've recorded quotes and concepts from each book. Some are meaningful; others I find funny.

While I provide a list of the best books I've read at the end of each year (2020 and 2021), I'm going to start posting once a month a few quotes from each book I've read.

The first entry in this series comes from October 2022 — The Caves of Steel by Isaac Asimov.

Summary

Below is a summary of the book, taken from the novel itself, with a few edits.

A millennium into the future two advancements have altered the course of human history: the colonization of the galaxy and the creation of the positronic brain. The Robot series chronicle the unlikely partnership between a New York City detective and a humanoid robot who must learn to work together.

Like most people left behind on an over-populated Earth, New York City police detective Elijah Baley had little love for either the arrogant Spacers [those that have left Earth and settled on other planets] or their robotic companions. But when a prominent Spacer is murdered under mysterious circumstances, Baley is ordered to the Outer Worlds to help track down the killer. The relationship between Life and his Spacer superiors, who distrusted all Earthmen, was strained from the start. Then he learned that they had assigned him a partner: R. Daneel Olivaw. Worst of all was that the "R" stood for robot — and his positronic partner was made in the image and likeness of the murder victim.

At the beginning of the story, detective Baley dislikes robots and is upset about working with one as a partner; as the case progresses, the two learn a great deal from one another.

Quotes

1.

“Yet no one, however philosophical, could give up those privileges, once acquired, without a pang. That was the point.”

Put simply, ignorance is bliss. We (society) have grown so accustomed to many luxuries that when we lose them, it's…

--

--

Cody Collins

Energy Finance Professional. Top writer in Investing, Economics, Technology, and Business. Co-Creator of Yard Couch. Email: cjcollins1997@gmail.com